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The Passive Participant

February 23, 2010

If you’re trying to get a project off the ground, you are going to encounter a great deal of rejection. Rejection hurts, but it’s a gift. Rejection frees the rejectee from wasting the most precious resource in film: Time. That said, there is nothing more dangerous to any film, or entrepreneurial endeavor, than the passive participant.

Whether you’re laboring to get your production rolling, or rolled out, you’ll find that most people you talk to in the movie business, aren’t in the movie business at all, they just want to be, or want to think they are. Streams of friendly people will tell you they are interested in your work, that they will get actively involved in moving it forward, and that they can have a positive impact on your progress. Unfortunately, more often than not, they aren’t interested, won’t get involved, and/or can’t help you – even if they wanted to.

The truth is, most conversations, meetings, and hoops we jump through to get a movie of any size made, seen, or sold, are dead ends. These time-consuming labyrinths are manned by seemingly well-meaning folks who enjoy meeting interesting, creative people, and sending them on wheel-spinning goosechases such as rewrites, recuts, and hunting expeditions for often unattainable people/organizations/resources, they themselves have no access to, or relationship with.

Why would they do this to us? I’m sure the logic is subjective, but usually it’s because they see themselves as above action, and live vicariously through the radical action of others.

‘Give Me Your Opinion’ versus ‘Give Me This Thing’
It’s a logical impulse to seek the advice of people you see as “further along” in the field to which you aspire. Asking an opinion is a natural icebreaker in any social situation because all people love to be heard. This approach makes sense if you actually want someone’s opinion, but it makes no sense if you simply want something from them. Simply put, “Give me your opinion of this script” is not “How can I get you to invest in this project”. The former puts the ball in their court to read a long document or listen to a pitch, and hopefully come to the conclusion you are fantasizing about. The latter puts the onus on you to own the conversation, and have your investment plan queued up and ready.

While it may seem obnoxious, business people appreciate forthrightness. It’s a common misconception that people of consequence want their asses kissed. They don’t – it’s a waste of time. It’s people of no consequence that want their asses kissed. Those people have all the time in the world to string you along with long, lazy meetings and (un)creative jam sessions that will wear you out and usually decimate any forward motion you once had. Avoid these people, they can only bog you down.

People who have power, on the other hand, do not want to play games. They may or may not opine on your work, but what they really want is for you to come to the point and quickly. Tell them what you have for them, what you want from them, and let them say yes or no. It’s not obnoxious, it’s honest, and it gets you where you’re going quicker (whether that’s further down the road with them, or onto the next pitch).

Asking opinions is usually a waste of time anyway. Most people’s opinions are based on nonsense, irrelevant ideas or logic, or a complete misconception of your work. It’s just plain wrong to think that any amount of experience makes someone an expert on your work. Your work is your work, good or bad. Obviously try to make it good, but some low-level production manager at a middling DTV production company isn’t going to help you make it better. He will tell you what he thinks your work should be, and will usually be wrong.

In the words of Joe Eszterhas, “Whether you’re talking about the studio executive or the actor or the cabdriver, you know, or the gofer or the gaffer …. they all think they’re writers, and they all want to change and rewrite what you’ve done.”

It’s one thing if you’re in a work for hire situation, but for God’s sake, don’t chase your tail on the orders of some stranger you think you need to impress. Particularly someone who isn’t bringing you money, or something else of immediate and quantifiable value. It costs a passive participant nothing to spin your wheels, but it can cost you all your formative years.

Conclusion
You have all the power and resources you need to do exactly what you want to do. Don’t waste time dancing for people that won’t get their hands dirty.

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2 comments

  1. Agreed.


  2. Interesting. The human condition almost requires us to be part of something bigger than ourselves. The bigger the better, without regard for their degree of contribution or in most cases, their lack there of. People help people they like. People do business with people they like. Be the best, work the hardest, smile the most and be like-able. Great thoughts in this article; filled with truth.



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