Posts Tagged ‘Life’

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Making an indie for it’s own sake

December 27, 2009

Every time I’m on the cusp of production, and things start spiraling out of control, someone always poses the question “why now?”, as in: “why are you making this film in May instead of June”, or “why not wait till next year?”, or “Why not just make a short film instead?”, “Why not wait till you have more: money, time, experience, help?”

‘Why make this film now?’ is a perfectly valid question, and the honest answer is determined by the filmmaking motivation itself. To get there, we’ll first answer the question ‘Why make this film?’

Why Now? / Why at All?
Speaking very generally here, solely for the sake of discussion, let’s say one of the following is the driving force behind the making of any movie:

1. Commission: An individual or business entity pays a sum of money for creative and/or production services (instructional or industrial, music video, advocacy, commercial, television, studio feature, etc).

2. Commercial Entrepreneurship: An individual or business entity embarks on an independent money-making action (Girls Gone Wild, Video Professor, etc).

3. Art for Art’s Sake: An individual or partnership embarks on a creative project simply to make said project, with no regard for economic or commercial benefit (Tarnation, Four-Eyed Monsters, etc).

Personally, I make films for reason #3. That’s not to disparage reasons #1 and #2, mind you. Being entrepreneurial and making money by filmic means is perfectly admirable, but for me, creating a construct to do so is no more interesting than opening my own convenience store or starting a landscaping company (both of which are also perfectly admirable).

I prefer instead to focus on making the movies I want to see, as honestly as possible, and to consider the economic viability of the work and how it should be marketed, after the creative process is complete.

[This, by the way, is not the only way to make a film, it’s just the way I do it. Many fine films have been made with a dozen writers, a room full of meddling studio executives, multiple focus groups, etc.]

So, if the answer to ‘why you are making the film?’ is Art for Art’s Sake, we’re back to ‘why now?’

Logic
If one cares about his art, doesn’t he owe it to the work to be patient and take whatever time he needs to build the proper infrastructure and assemble the resources necessary to make the film all it can be?

I understand why people think this, and for many projects – especially those that require immense resources to exist (animated, epic, FX-heavy) – it really might be the right thing to do. In my experience, however, this wide open, wait-for-the-right-time approach is a death sentence for a project getting off the ground, particularly when the purpose of the work is the work itself.

The problem with this logic is that in the context of making an independent production, an open-ended or distant shoot date, removes present adversity – a critical component in mobilizing radicals in any anti-establishment or underground operation (which all independent films are). More time rarely leads to more money, what it does lead to is wavering attention spans and the inevitable attrition of your co-conspirators.

Without conflict, there is no story. Without looming deadlines, there is no urgent scramble to make things happen. With no urgency, the challenge of the independent feature is diluted, and your people are no longer afraid or angry. Without fear and anger there is no hunger for action – the lifeblood of the independent feature.

Your intention may have been to make the best picture possible, but you ended up with no picture at all. No good!

Going Against Logic
If you’re doing Art for Art’s Sake, you must strike while the iron is hot. The heat is the thing that drives it, and you have to harness that energy and quickly turn it into action. Waiting is not only a wet blanket on smoldering enthusiasm, but it also means delaying the creation of content while time passes. The longer you wait, the less time you are alive, the less stuff you have created, and the less potential you’ve realized (because you’ve had less practice realizing it).

My thinking on this is probably informed by the fact that I was 30 years old when I decided I wanted to make movies for the rest of my life, so there’s always been a ‘time-sensitive’ component to my decision making. I also have a background as a Jazz musician, the practice of which is predicated on the creative process occurring in an unpredictable, precarious context (both harmonically, as well as lifestyle). Suffice it to say, the instability of indie film and all that comes with it, has never been that scary to me.

Some people believe making a film without proper resources, experience, all the right preparation, etc., will result in a bad film. This thinking is totally reasonable for those who do not make films, but a wrong-headed waste of brainwork for anyone who does. Overcoming this kind of doubt is the ultimate test of your fortitude as a filmmaker. If you aren’t strong enough to believe in your work from inception, to have not only confidence, but overconfidence, about your potential – if you do not (privately) believe you’re making the greatest film ever made – you should consider opening a convenience store or landscaping company. You’ll still get criticized, but the bloggers will probably not flame you for being self-indulgent, being an inept story teller, or making a film that is too dumb or too smart for its own good.

It is essential for practitioners of any artform to actually practice their artform. To create. If that means tolerating frequent criticism and ridicule from individuals who create nothing, suck it up. If you haven’t the sack to circumvent your own doubts, your fragile ego will never survive what’s to come if your film is ever released.

Filmmaking is not some sort of mysterious witchcraft that only super-human rocket scientists in Castle Grayskull can do. Filmmaking is comprised of regular human tasks, requiring regular human skills, each to be performed by a regular human being. You will learn in the doing. Skill is not magic or genius, or athletic gift. Skill is perspective, and perspective is only gained through experience.

To put it in even more aphoristic, Steven Seagal-like terms: If, over the course of five years, a martial artist only ever practices form and never spars, he will not fare well in combat, especially against an experienced opponent. If a martial artist has twenty fights a day in that same five-year period, chances are he will have a good perspective on combat, and, at the very least, approach a more experienced opponent with less trepidation and emotional interference for having experienced combat so many times before.

The other possible outcome to that story is that the guy that did 20 fights a day for five years, kicks the living shit out of all comers. Only God knows how you will fare as you pass though the thresholds of experience, but hiding yourself away from the challenge teaches you nothing.

Similarly, taking meetings does not teach you to be a better filmmaker. Nor does reading blogs, or books, or listening to people tell you what you should or shouldn’t do. I enjoy talking as much as the next blowhard, but nobody ever learned how to do anything, filmmaking or otherwise, by having a theoretical discussion about it.

The only thing that teaches any of us anything is the experience of doing it for ourselves, because the way each of us responds to a learning experience is totally subjective. Nobody, including ourselves, knows what we are capable of in this life. There is no reason not to assume the very best in ourselves and our potential. There is also no reason not to fight dirty, pull hair, bite, and kick our obstructions in the nuts, so we can achieve what we want in this world.

The Downside
Even the smallest features cost a lot of money and pride. If you only have a duct-taped video camera, one light, and $200 to make the feature of your dreams, you can still do it, but understand that what you lack in cash and gear, you and your colleagues will make up for in sweat and man hours.

You can get everything you need to make a movie for free if you shake enough hands and appeal to the right people in the right way, but that in itself is a fulltime job for everyone involved. Still, this is nothing you should shy away from. It’s done every day to great effect by much dumber people than you. Besides, there’s no greater character-building exercise than making something out of nothing. And if that something turns out to be something beautiful, the hard times will disappear from your memory… because it was worth it.

Conclusion
If you want it, do it.

Making a feature film under any circumstance is a God-awful, herculean task, but if you’re truly committed, and resolve to do whatever it takes to see it through to the bitter end, making your independent feature will be an incredibly rewarding, and life-changing experience.

Make the movie you want to watch. Use everything at your disposal to make it as good as it can be. Don’t wait. What you plan to do in some imagined future doesn’t exist. Make the film, and what you do now is forever.

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